EXHIBITION
How to House 7000 People In Skid Row.
Exhibition created by Rosten Woo with Anna Kobara, Henriëtte Brouwers, John Malpede.
March 7 though August 29, 2020

The museum is closed because of the COVID_19 pandemic.
You can visit the exhibition webpage here.

We can accommodate two visitors at a time, or a group of family members to visit the exhibition in person. You can make an appointment by writing us at info@lapovertydept.org
Stay well, safe and sane!

How to house 7,000 people in Skid Row?
We’re talking about housing everyone now living on the streets of Skid Row –and more.  

Tired of promises and no solutions to L.A.’s housing crisis? At the exhibition, learn together and in public how housing works and could work in L.A.

A coalition of Skid Row community members and groups have created “Skid Row Now & 2040” a plan that identifies funding sources to house people who have extremely low incomes.  The exhibition created by Woo, Kobara, Brouwers & Malpede makes the solutions in the plan graphically legible.

You will be able to understand how each funding mechanism works and how many dollars could be raised and therefore how many people could be housed by the City’s adoption of these income-generating tools.  They include dollars for housing that could be generated from: inclusionary zoning, a vacancy tax, and the creation of a tax-increment financing district.  Worry not— all these concepts will be graphically and simply explained by the exhibition.  What you get to do is choose your mechanisms and determine their geographical boundaries.  When your stack of dollars from each of your sources reaches $3.5 Billion, Congratulations!  You have a viable plan for housing 7,000 People in Skid Row.  Next: the hard work of getting City Council to enact it.

At the March 7th opening, The Los Angeles Poverty Department will present a 25-minute introduction to the exhibition —-a dystopic, performative warning: one that imagines a new Amazon headquarters in Skid Row.

During the development phase of the project, “How to House 7,000 People on Skid Row,” presented two public conversations with housing policy experts and community organizers.  Additional public events will take place during the run of the exhibition.  At the next event, on Wednesday March 18, from 4-8pm, members of the Anti-Eviction Mapping Project will continue to collect stories associated with particular places on Skid Row— a continuation of the work they began in October at the Festival for All Skid Row Artists.

The project “How to House 7,000 People in Skid Row” is supported with funding from A Blade of Grass, The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, with additional support provided by an Engaging Humanities Grant from the University of California Humanities Research Institute.

Panel and conversation
How to house 7,000 people in Skid Row?
November 13, 2019
We’re talking about housing everyone now living on the streets of Skid Row –and more. Join us at The Skid Row History Museum to learn together and in public how housing works and could work in LA.
We’ve invited three housing policy experts to talk with one another and tell us everything we’ve always wanted to know about how to build housing in Los Angeles. All 3 of them have worked in Skid Row and stood up for the neighborhood. You probably know one or more of them:
Molly Rysman, Housing and Homelessness Deputy, LA County;
Eric Ares, Manager of Homeless Systems Change for United Way of Greater Los Angeles;
Jerry Jones, Director of Public Policy, Inner City Law Center & Director of The Provider Alliance.
A coalition of Skid Row community members and groups have created “Skid Row Now & 2040” a plan that identifies funding sources to house people who have extremely low incomes. We’re going to look at the plan–and additional ideas for funding housing that will get people off the streets and into housing.


Panel and conversation:
Plans of Our Own – Community Responses to the DTLA 2040 plan
January 27, 2020
The Skid Row History Museum
For years LA’s, Department of City Planning has been producing a vision for downtown LA that completely overhaul’s the land-use framework of the city, imagines nearly 200,000 new residents, and nearly 60 billion dollars of land value by 2040. The first complete draft of that plan is set to be formally released this year.
Join Steve Diaz (LACAN), Tak Suzuki (Little Tokyo Service Center), Sissy Trinh (Southeast Asian Community Alliance), and Doug Smith (Public Counsel) to learn more about the City’s early proposals and what this means for the future of downtown Los Angeles, specifically the communities of Skid Row, Chinatown, and Little Tokyo.
This event also serves as the formal launch of the Central City United People’s Plan, a resident-led vision developed by LACAN, LTSC, SEACA, and Public Counsel. It’s time to get educated and get involved, the stakes couldn’t be higher.